Everett Moran

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Engineer/Producer Everett Moran

 

The photo above is of Everett Moran, owner of Rainshadow Recording Studio in Port Townsend. Everett is helping me record my upcoming CD. A Texas native, Everett spent much of his youth in Houston, my home town. His parents live not far from where I went to high school. His interesting path to becoming an audio engineer is chronicled in an article in the Port Townsend newspaper.

Rainshadow is a terrific studio. The acoustics of the studio itself are wonderfully warm and exquisitely fashioned. One of my greatest pleasures during the recording was just singing in the center of it and listening to my voice reverberating warmly.

Outside of his studio, Everett has been a freelance engineer, working all around the country including Denver, Austin and Tulsa, a city that has become special to him.  I’ll have more to say about Everett in the next few months as we continue to work on the CD.

 

Race and Comedy: Go to 22:30 in the video

 

Very funny material. Two great comedians. Two different shows. Race really shows through. George – just as bright and funny as Richard – gives us a glimpse into his imagination. Richard gives us a glimpse into his life, and how different they are from the men beside him.

The gift of reflective comedy is the stark truth.

At 22:30 into the video, Johnny and Richard share stories about being caught stealing as kids.  Richard talks about how tough his father was with him – and gets laughs. Johnny describes how, when he got caught shoplifting, the store manager marched him down to his father’s office. Richard immediately asks, “Your father had an office?”

In that instant, you’re punched with the context of the two men’s lives.

 

“Texas Dick” a Partial Reading of the film Script

Before turning back to wring novels and songs, I wrote six film scripts which  include Texas Dick, Stealing Apollo, and Hello in There. All were represented. Two were optioned. None were produced. That’s show biz. But as Yogi Berra said, “It ain’t over ’til it’s over.”

Below is the script and video of a cold read of a portion of my Texas Dick script. In the scenario two men in floppy hats and tights have been found unconscious in the darkness along a remote West Texas highway.  The men awake at 1:00 AM believing that they are the Shakespearean characters the villainous Richard III and the pompous clown Sir John Falstaff from Henry IV.

To read and print the script pages click this link:  Texas Dick Cold Readers Performance

To watch the video click the image below:

Sperry Hunt Music

Below are blog posts from my years of writing manuscripts for novels in Seattle. Two years ago I retired to Boise, Idaho to focus on writing and performing my music. I welcome you to look and listen to what I’ve been doing at

“Sperry Hunt Music” on Facebook. There you can see my performance schedule and current videos.

Search “Sperry Hunt” on YouTube for other videos.

And you’re welcome of course to look at my years of blog posts below.

Hans and Fritz, the screenplay

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Dr. Hans Lehmann and Sperry Hunt; Seattle, WA 3/5/1999

In 1995 I was commissioned to write a screenplay about Dr. Hans Lehmann’s experiences. The screenplay was never produced despite my and Hans’ efforts. I’ll write more about this later. In the meantime please click on the following to learn about what an interesting and generous couple Dr. Lehmann and his wife Thelma were.*

Lehmann, J. Hans (1911-1996), Ballard Hospital founder and arts patron

*Thanks to writer Walt Crowley and HistoryLink.org

My friend Clay Lindley, the funniest cowboy poet I ever met

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Leading the string of horses in this photograph is Clay Lindley: cowboy, poet, actor, comedian, husband, father and friend. I knew Clay only briefly. He passed in 2005. My friend Joanna Cowell, a leader of the Alpine drama community, recommended him as an actor for the Texas Dick trailer. (Click on image below to see trailer.) Clay was one of those rare celestial people who could instantly brightened a room with his warmth and humor. A true comedian, he produced humor from thin air, sometimes it was one’s own expense. I felt the sting of his wit, but it was always delivered with a gleam of laughter that made you like him even more.

I’ll write more about Clay and the trailer. Please click on the first link below to watch his performance.  He has the first lines 25 seconds into the trailer.  He’s talking to the sheriff of the fictional town of Little Bend, Texas about how – in the manner of a Shakespearean play – the planets are in alignment signaling a portentous event. Click on the image and the trailer will begin:

clay-lindley

Here’s more about Clay from his obituary:

Clayton M. Lindley was born on July 21, 1959 in Del Rio, Texas to Jane and Buster Lindley. He graduated from Silver City, N.M. High School, where he excelled as a swimmer. Clay graduated from Sul Ross University in Alpine, then followed his dream by cowboying in Montana. He later became a Range Specialist with the Natural Resources Conservation Service. Clay earned his nickname, Cletus, while working for NRCS in Spur, Texas.
Clay was a rare survivor of childhood leukemia and made it a point to enjoy everyday of his life. He possessed the ability to make everyone around him laugh and smile, and he loved doing it.
Cletus was called home on Thursday, September 1, 2005 following a battle with stomach cancer. Services were held at the First United Methodist Church in Mertzon, Texas on Monday, September 5, 2005. Burial was in the Sherwood Cemetery just down the road from Mertzon.
Pall bearers were Mark Donet, George Ramsey, Marty Donet, Charlie Donet, Robert Gibbons, and John Zeuberbuler.
Honorary pallbearers were Gil Prather, Donnie Franklin, Sonny Fry, Steve St. Clair and Bill Whitley.

Recording a Demo at Electric Wall Studios

Demo at Electric Wall Studios 3

Last Sunday I spent over four and a half hours recording a rough demo of twelve of my songs at Electric Wall Studios in Seattle’s Capital Hill district. I want to thank my friend and recording engineer Brendan  Mills-McCabe (shown above) for his skill and patience during the session. The shot on the right was taken from behind the microphones where I sat, facing the control room.

I haven’t heard the mix yet. But when I do, I will post one or two cuts. The purpose of the demo is to gauge how close I am to recording a CD, this winter perhaps.

Here’s a link to the commodious studios.

Electric Wall Studios